Siirry sisältöön
Suodata listausta

Logical thinking and processing of information

Early childhood education

  • Learning environments are designed so that children can practise the thinking skills required in programming in their play: classification, comparing and putting into order. Regularities and repeated things are also observed with the children.

Pre-primary education

    • The children are allowed to experiment with and produce functions which are repeated regularly, such as rhythms, in a playful way. They also contemplate cause and effect. Together, the children verbalise and explain the choices they have made.
    • Children are guided in classifying, comparing and putting things into order based on specific criteria, such as shape, size or colour.

Grades 1–2

    • The pupil is able to arrange and compare things based on different criteria, such as similarity of shape. The pupil can recognise logical operations, such as “and”, “or”, “no”.
    • The pupil is able to use concepts and concrete tools to talk about their choices and observations.

Grades 3–6

    • The pupil can organise, compare and present information using concepts and symbols related to technology.
    • The pupil is able to perceive connections between different entities. The pupil is also able to find and describe causal relationships between things.

Grades 7–9

    • The pupil is able to process different types of information, use different ways of marking when processing the information, and carry out logical operations with the information.
    • The pupil uses algorithmic thinking in research related to different subjects and projects and when producing and presenting information.

Solving and modelling of problems

Early childhood education

  • Children are encouraged to wonder and pose questions about the phenomena and issues around them and look for answers and solutions to them themselves. Children name and explain phenomena together.

Pre-primary education

  • Children are encouraged to explore and structure everyday phenomena and reflect on questions related to them. They practise describing and explaining observations and reflect on their own solutions.

Grades 1–2

  • The pupil is able to break a problem related to a familiar everyday problem into smaller parts, and to look for and experiment with different solutions to solve it. The pupil is able to explain the solutions they have used.

Grades 3–6

    • The pupil is able to use different methods and solution patterns to solve the problem and also tries to create these themselves. The pupil is able to evaluate solutions using a criterion such as functionality, readability or effectiveness.

Grades 7–9

    • The pupil is able to analyse problems and evaluate their possible solutions based on different criteria, and visualises problems and solutions with the help of generalisations and diagrams.
    • The pupil uses algorithmic thinking in problem solving related to different subjects and projects.

Activities, concepts and basic structures of programming

Early childhood education

  • Children learn to follow instructions by playing or carrying out functional tasks. The instructions may be physical, visual, verbal or based on sounds.

Pre-primary education

  • Children familiarise themselves with the concept of algorithm by examining different instructions and ways to give instructions. They try giving and following instructions playfully.

Grades 1–2

  • The pupil is able to create step-by-step instructions using simple commands and a loop. The pupil identifies error situations caused by the instructions and tries out solutions to rectify them.

Grades 3–6

  • The pupil is able to create precise and detailed instructions using loops and selection control structures. The pupil looks for and rectifies errors in instructions and in programme code.
    • The pupil is able to create and test instructions without devices, and uses algorithms to control the devices that they are programming.

Grades 7–9

    • The pupil knows how different kinds of programming structures, such as sequential, repeated and conditional actions as well as variables, work. The pupil can design a program using these.
    • The pupil is able to interpret a text-based programming language and can identify different kinds of structures in a program code created in this language.

Other programming competence descriptions

Other competences